08.03.2021, 18:23

CAAV proposes allowing Boeing B737 Max aircraft to transit in Vietnam

CAAV proposes allowing Boeing B737 Max aircraft to transit in Vietnam

A Boeing 737 Max aircraft gains altitude. The Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam has proposed the Ministry of Transport allow the Boeing B737Max aircraft to transit in Vietnam – PHOTO: VNA

HCMC – The Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam (CAAV) has proposed the Ministry of Transport allow the Boeing B737 Max aircraft to transit in Vietnam, following Boeing’s efforts in handling safety problems.

The proposal was also based on the assessment of some international aviation agencies such as the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the Transport Canada Civil Aviation and the National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil (ANAC) and the operating index of its aircraft.

The authority also said that it would continue to keep a close watch on and update information from other international aviation agencies from China, Australia and Russia, Thanh Nien Online reported.

After three international aviation agencies permit the operation of the aircraft, CAAV will propose the ministry allow the aircraft to travel to/from Vietnam and grant certificates so that this type of aircraft can be imported into Vietnam. The work is set to be completed within six to 12 months.

After the incidents involving the Boeing 737 Max aircraft of the Indonesian airline Lion Air in October 2018 and of Ethiopia’s Ethiopian Airlines in March last year, international investigative agencies found that the reason for the deadly crashes was related to technical flaws of the Boeing 737 Max plane model. Boeing has done away with the flaws.

The B737 Max aircraft have resumed commercial flights in the U.S. airspace since December 28, 2020, while ANAC allowed the aircraft to fly again from December last year.

Following suit, EASA lifted its flight ban on the Boeing 737 Max in January this year, along with other countries in the world.

Meanwhile, some countries such as China, Russia, Australia and Southeast Asia are still banning the operation of the aircraft in their airspace.